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Horopito, Kolorex, Supercharged Food and Oku Kawakawa Tea
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Hints and tips — thrush

Medicinal Power of Horopito in NZ

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Medicinal Power of Horopito in NZ

Studies were published by Forest Herbs

Tuesday, 19 April 2016, 4:50 pm

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Did you know? Nature Versus Pharmaceuticals

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Did you know? Nature Versus Pharmaceuticals

Anti-Candida Herb: Kolorex Horopito An ancient herb backed by science: your answer to candida-related health problems In 1982 scientists at the University of Canterbury discovered an extract from New Zealand’s horopito plant containing polygodial was more effective at killing Candida albicans than the powerful pharmaceutical anti-Candida drug, Amphotericin B. The graph shows polygodial has a larger zone inhibiting the growth of Candida albicans and the zone is formed within 1 day. This means that polygodial has stronger and faster antifungal action than Amphotericin B.(Reference: McCallion et al 1982. Planta Medica, vol 44, pp134-138) Three years later Forest Herbs Research began developing ways to offer...

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Qualities of Horopito as a Medicine

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Qualities of Horopito as a Medicine

Ancient Remedies using Horopito Horopito, (Pseudowintera colorata)  only grows in New Zealand. This ancient shrub is a member of the primitive Winteraceae family, more common to the Southern Pacific regions. Simply put the plant is ancient – one of the first flowering plants almost unchanged for 65 million year (according to fossil records).  Horopito has a long history of medicinal use by Maori. The leaves were bruised, steeped in water and used for paipai (a skin disease) and venereal diseases (such as thrush/candida) The leaves were also chewed for toothache and were rubbed on mothers’ breasts for weaning infants. When the Europeans arrived...

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